News | 21 Feb 2023

Introducing our renovated African Forecasting Service

Noelani King Conradie

Managing Director, OE Africa

Johannesburg, South Africa

To coincide with the revamp, we published a report featuring the four most important elections on the continent in 2023. Click here to download the report “Africa: The most important elections in 2023”.

Africa is host to some of the fastest growing economies on the planet, but idiosyncratic risks and susceptibility to external shocks mean the continent is also host to considerable growth volatility. To better support our clients to navigate volatility in Africa and drive business growth, we are pleased to announce that we have revamped our African Forecasting Service.

“For businesses who want to tap into opportunities in Africa, we bring together a global perspective and on-the-ground expertise to address the most pressing issues for Africa’s today and tomorrow. We provide up-to-date political and economic commentary, narrated into a single actionable view, enabling businesses to move with confidence in the world’s most dynamic continent,” said Noelani King Conradie, the Managing Director of Oxford Economics Africa.

How do we help our clients to better drive business growth in Africa?

At Oxford Economics Africa we enable our clients to capitalize on volatility and support them to:

What do we offer through our renovated solutions?

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