Recent Release | 08 Aug 2022

The Economic Impact of Reckitt in India: Supporting India’s Growth and Ambitions

Economic Consulting Team

Oxford Economics

Reckitt is a world-leading health, hygiene, and nutrition company, which invests in the care and development of the world’s population—all in the purpose of creating a cleaner, healthier world. This includes an important presence in India—one of Reckitt’s top three markets, where it has been operational since 1934.

Our new report, commissioned by Reckitt, evaluates the total contribution the company’s operations in India made to India’s economy and society in 2021. Our analysis shows that Reckitt supported a total contribution to GDP in India of INR78.8 billion (£775 million), and supported more than 69,000 jobs in 2021.

Reckitt also invests in the productive potential of the Indian economy by investing in Research and Development (R&D). Most notably, Reckitt has three R&D facilities in India, including the vector-borne disease Entomology ‘Centre of Excellence’ in Gurgaon.

Our research also investigates Reckitt’s contribution to wider social development in India, including its investment in upskilling its workforce, and support to local communities to lead healthier and more hygienic lives.

About the team

Our economic consulting team are world leaders in quantitative economic analysis, working with clients around the globe and across sectors to build models, forecast markets and evaluate interventions using state-of-the art techniques. Lead consultants on this project included:

Stephen Foreman

Associate Director, Economic Impact

+44 (0) 203 910 8107

Stephen Foreman

Associate Director, Economic Impact

London, United Kingdom

Stephen leads a team of economists who assess the economic impact of a variety of different firms and industries. Recent consultancy projects he has led include assessments for the World Travel and Tourism Council, Dubai Free Zones Council, the Aerospace Technology Institute, Funding Circle, Reckitt, and ASOS.

Stephen has also worked on Oxford’s Global Industry Service where he was responsible for forecasting the global transport sector, leading Oxford Economics’ industry research, and managing consultancy projects for industrial organisations.

Stephen joined Oxford Economics from the UK civil service, where he worked on a range of macroeconomic, fiscal, tax and welfare policy issues across HM Treasury, the Office for Budget Responsibility and the Department for Work and Pensions.

Elizabeth Martindale

Economist

+44 (0)203 910 8154

Elizabeth Martindale

Economist

London, United Kingdom

Since joining Oxford Economics in February 2022, Elizabeth has worked on various economic and social impact projects. Prior to this, Elizabeth worked as a Lecturer for the Economics Department at Manchester Metropolitan University. Elizabeth also has experience as a Financial Consultant at KPMG Luxembourg, which allowed her to gain French and German language skills. Elizabeth holds an MSc in Development Economics and Policy from The University of Manchester and a BSc (Hons) in Economics from Manchester Metropolitan University. Her main research specialisations include Gender, Health Economics, Inequality, and Governance.

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