Podcast | 19 May 2021

The Future of Australian Infrastructure: Australia’s Global Competitiveness

The current investment in Australian infrastructure is barely keeping pace with demand. To meet future demand we will need to invest more but also, crucially, build and operate major assets more efficiently.

Transport accounts for an incredible 50% of all the infrastructure engineering construction work done in Australia. Over the past 30 years we have added over 100,000 km of roads to our network and more than doubled the annual spend on rail. We are travelling more and unfortunately spending relatively more time doing so.

What will the infrastructure that is funded, designed and built in 20 years’ time look like? We interview industry heavyweights to provide their views in our Future of Infrastructure video series.

 

Interview with Adrian Hart, Associate Director, BIS Oxford Economics by MinterEllison.

Part 2: Adrian discusses the global competitiveness of Australia’s infrastructure market, particularly compared to the mature markets of APAC and Europe.

Watch the interview below:

 

Part 1: The Future of Australian Infrastructure: Market snapshot and drivers

Part 3: The Future of Infrastructure: Utilising infrastructure stimulus

 

 

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