Recent release | 03 Mar 2014

The Cost of Brain Drain

Firms have long understood that losing staff is a key risk to success, but the financial cost of staff turnover has received little attention.

Working with Unum, this report analyses the financial impact of staff turnover across five key sectors (IT/Tech, Accounting, Legal, Media/Advertising and Retail). These costs are split into two main components. Firstly, and most importantly, is the cost of lost output while a new worker gets up to the standard expected of them (“optimal productivity”). The second, which is probably more familiar, is the logistical cost of finding and absorbing a new worker.

These costs vary substantially across three key variables – the sector in question, the size of the firm hiring a new employee, and the background of the worker being recruited. 

Our report for Unum used a bespoke survey dataset as well as official data from the Labour Force Survey to analyse the costs firms in five key sectors face when they replace professional workers. The report attracted extensive national press coverage, including in the Financial Times, the Independent and the Telegraph, as well as in several recruitment and HR related publications.

Related Services

Post

Tight labour market and firm pay growth will worry the MPC

Contentious new Labour Force Survey data implies the UK jobs market was much tighter in H2 2023 than we previously thought, while our own sentiment data developed with Penta suggests conditions are little changed in early-2024.

Find Out More

Post

The long-term outlook for Northern African cities

North African cities are forecast to experience some of the fastest rates of employment and population growth over the long term. GDP growth is also forecast to be near the top of the global pack, just trailing behind sub-Saharan Africa.

Find Out More

Post

The long-term outlook for Middle Eastern cities

Middle Eastern cities are forecast to experience some of the fastest rates of employment and population growth over the long term. However, GDP growth is forecast to be middle of the global pack.

Find Out More