Recent Release | 10 Mar 2023

Adecco Labour Market Outlook

Cities Consulting Team

Oxford Economics

Oxford Economics provided economic and labour market insight and forecasts for the Spring 2023 edition of Adecco’s Labour Market Outlook.

Oxford Economics provided economic and labour market insight and forecasts for the Spring 2023 edition of Adecco’s Labour Market Outlook. In the report, we explore what is likely to happen to the UK economy and labour market in 2023, and what the longer-term prospects might be. We look at the overall picture, at differences between sectors, and also at the outlook for the 12 nations and regions of the UK.

The experts behind the research

Our Cities Consulting team specialise in analysing and forecasting cities and regions around the world. Drawing on our detailed forecast data and a range of modelling tools, we work with clients globally across sectors to produce studies that are tailored to their needs and to help them make informed decisions. The lead consultant on this project was:

Tim Lyne

Associate Director, Cities & Regions

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