Ungated Post | 01 Mar 2019

Women, leadership, and the priority paradox

While women may be in fewer leadership positions worldwide, those organizations with more females at the top outperform their peers.

Oxford Economics worked with IBM’s Institute for Business Value IBV to survey 2,300 executives and professionals – an equal number of women and men – from organizations worldwide across multiple industries to better understand why the gender gap in leadership persists and what can be done to ignite real change.

Respondents included individual C-suite officers (CEOs, CIOs, CFOs, CMOs, COOs, CHROs, and others) as well as senior VPs, VPs, directors, middle managers, and nonmanagerial professionals to capture current leaders’ assessments and assessments from those who could be potential future leaders.

The 10 industries represented included banking, consumer products, education, government, healthcare, insurance, manufacturing, retail, technology, and telecommunications. They each comprise 10% of the total sample. The countries/regions in the survey represent a mix of areas where the gender gap ranges from small to large, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report (2017). Each country (or region) comprises 11% of the total sample.

Download the IBM Women in leadership survey

Download the IBM Women in leadership survey infographic

Our Thought Leadership team produces original, evidence-based research made accessible to decision-makers and opinion leaders. Principals for this project included:

Oxford Economics’ team is expert at applying advanced economic tools that provide valuable insights into today’s most pressing business, financial, and policy issues.

To find out more about our capabilities, contact:

EMEA
Paul Donnelly
+44 (0)203 910 8077
Email

Americas
Diantha Redd
+1 (646) 503 3052
Email

Asia
Christie Tang
+852 3974 8841
Email

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