Ungated Post | 20 May 2015

Rethinking Overtime

Today, some 3.3 million salaried workers across the US retail and restaurant industries can be exempted from the right to receive overtime pay because they earn at least $455 per week—the so-called overtime threshold. The Department of Labor is currently preparing a proposal that would change the rules that govern overtime payment.

To better understand the effects of these changes, Oxford Economics conducted an analysis using three possible modifications of the overtime regulation—raising the wage threshold to $610, $808, and $965 per week. This report explores the effects on the retail and restaurant industries under these three scenarios.

Read the full report.

About the National Retail Federation
NRF is the world’s largest retail trade association, representing discount and department stores, home goods and specialty stores, Main Street merchants, grocers, wholesalers, chain restaurants and Internet retailers from the United States and more than 45 countries. To find out more, please go to www.nrf.com.

Oxford Economics’ team is expert at applying advanced economic tools that provide valuable insights into today’s most pressing business, financial, and policy issues.

To find out more about our capabilities, contact:

Americas
Diantha Redd
+1 (646) 503 3052
Email

Asia Pacific
Peter Suomi
+65 6850 0110
Email

EMEA
Aoife Pearson
+44 (0)203 910 8054
Email

Related Services

Post

Delivering Value: The Economic Impact of the Civil Nuclear Industry

The study suggests the civil nuclear industry supports a £16.1 billion contribution to UK GDP, 211,500 jobs, and £7.1 billion in tax revenues. 24% occurs in the North West and 16% in the South West.

Find Out More

Post

Innovation Index: Are You Prepared to Shift from Survival to Growth?

Oxford Economics and NTT Data fielded a survey of 1,000 North American business and IT executives in 2022 to uncover future strategies to mitigate disruption.

Find Out More

Post

Reinventing for growth in a changing media landscape

Oxford Economics partnered with Accenture to survey 6,000 consumers around the world about their media and entertainment habits, experiences, and preferences.

Find Out More