Research Briefing | Apr 28, 2021

US | City Economic Forecast: Atlanta

CEF Atlanta March 2021 - iPad

Atlanta has recovered 52% of its lost jobs from the pandemic as of Q1, which was in line with the US recovery rate of 52%. Atlanta is expected to see job growth of 2.6% in 2021 and 3.2% in 2022, while GDP is expected to grow 7.3% in 2021 and 3.3% in 2022. With a diverse economy that had seen sizable growth across a number of sectors including education, Atlanta is expected to recover its lost jobs in Q3 2022. Longer term, Atlanta is expected to see net 2019-2025 job growth of 3.2% which ranks 23rd of the top 51 metros. Its net GDP growth rate of 13.1% ranks 15th.

What you will learn:

  • Although Atlanta’s economy has thrived on a diversity of headquarter firms including Coca Cola, CNN, and Delta—in industries that shed jobs in 2020—its burgeoning tech sector fared better as internet hosting firms added 1,400 jobs (+10%). 
  • The busiest airport in the country, Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International, serves the broad region. Air transportation jobs, however, fell by 6,900 (-23%) in 2020.
  • With three large universities drawing many young people to the region, Atlanta was expected to grow at a healthy rate, but it struggles with wide income disparity and high living costs in many fast-growing suburban areas. 

Back to Resource Hub

Related Services

Eurozone durable goods

Post

Eurozone: Nowcasts show a cold start to 2024, but warming later

Our suite of nowcasting models corroborates our tepid near-term expectations for the hibernating eurozone economy, indicating Q1 growth will come in at 0.1% q/q. This is a touch below our 0.2% q/q baseline forecast, though the spread of results across our models plus mixed signals from latest data highlight the uncertainty around the immediate growth outlook.

Find Out More

Post

Will Japan policy adjustments accompany the end of NIRP?

Markets appear to be increasingly converging with our forecast that the Bank of Japan will abolish its negative interest rate policy at the April meeting, but views diverge on whether any other policy adjustments will accompany the end of NIRP.

Find Out More