Consulting | 04 Sep 2017

Global Infrastructure Outlook

Macro Consulting Team

Oxford Economics

A well-functioning, modern infrastructure is central to economic development and to quality of life. From the roads and railways needed to transport people and goods, to the power plants and communications networks that underpin economic and household activity, to the basic human need for clean water and sanitation, infrastructure matters to people and businesses everywhere.

However, there have been relatively few attempts to track and monitor infrastructure investment across countries and sectors. This has made it difficult to predict how, where and when investment is most needed. 

Over the last year or so we have been working with the Global Infrastructure Hub to address this knowledge gap. Our study seeks to estimate how much the world needs to spend on infrastructure in the years to 2040, and in which countries and sectors this investment will be required. The granularity the study provides is unique: it collates data and creates forecasts for seven sectors in 50 countries, over a period of 25 years.

We estimate global infrastructure investment needs to be $94 trillion between 2016 and 2040. This is 19 percent higher than would be delivered under current trends, and is an average of $3.7 trillion per year. To meet this investment need, the world will need to increase the proportion of GDP it dedicates to infrastructure to 3.5 percent, compared to the 3.0 percent expected under current trends.

About the team

Our macro consulting team are world leaders in quantitative economic analysis, working with clients around the globe and across sectors to build models, forecast markets and evaluate interventions using state-of-the art techniques. Lead consultants on this project were:

Andrew P Goodwin

Director of Applied Economics, Europe & Middle East

+44 (0)203 910 8050

Andrew P Goodwin

Director of Applied Economics, Europe & Middle East

London

Andrew is Director of Applied Economics, Europe & Middle East, and is based in our London office.

Since joining Oxford Economics in 2013 Andrew has led studies across a range of subject areas for public and private sector clients. These include projects for the Global Infrastructure Hub and PwC to forecast global infrastructure needs; economic impact studies in the aviation, maritime and defence sectors; work for cultural institutions such as the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the British Library; analysing the impact of R&D support for clients including BEIS and the Centre for Process Innovation; and labour market studies for the UK Commission for Employment and Skills, the Department for Transport, and the Northern Ireland Department for Employment and Learning.

Before joining Oxford Economics, Andrew spent six years working as a Government economist at the Home Office and Department for Transport. Prior to that Andrew worked at DTZ Research and Consulting, where his responsibilities included analysing local economies and economic forecasting. Andrew holds an MSc in European Economic Integration from the University of Kent, where his dissertation analysed drivers of growth for European cities, and a BA in Economics with European Study from the University of Exeter.

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