UK Macro, Cities and Industry Outlook

Spring appears to have firmly sprung for the UK economy, with the speedy rollout of vaccines and a relaxation of restrictions promising a rapid rebound in activity from 2020’s Covid-related slump. But the outlook for the economy is hardly short of uncertainties. To what extent will households dip into savings accumulated during lockdowns and fuel a hoped-for consumer rebound? Will a resurgence of inflation prove a spectre at the feast? How worried should we be about the dangers of persistent “scarring” to the economy’s capacity as a result of the pandemic? And how will the housing market fare in a post-Covid world? Join us, as we explore these questions, and more, from a macro, sectoral and regional perspective.

Please note that we will be holding one webinar each for Americas, APAC and EMEA friendly timezones:

  • EMEA – Thursday 20th May | 10:00 BST
  • Americas – Thursday 20th May | 16:00 EDT
  • APAC – Friday 21st May | 10:00 HKT

Copy of Headshot - circle (10)

 

 

Martin Beck| Lead Economist

Martin Beck is a Lead Economist at Oxford Economics. He is responsible for forecasting and monitoring the UK economy and works on a variety of UK macro-related consultancy projects. Martin contributes regular articles to a number of our publications and is also responsible for OE’s forecast for the Irish economy.

Prior to working for Oxford Economics, Martin spent almost two years at Capital Economics, where he worked on Capital’s UK macro and UK consumer services. He was responsible for producing UK macroeconomic analysis and forecasts on a national, sectoral and industry level. Before joining Capital, Martin spent 11 years as an economist in HM Treasury, where he worked in a variety of macroeconomic, microeconomic and policy roles. Martin has a first class degree in economics and a Master’s degree with distinction in economics from the University of London.

 

Copy of Headshot - circle (11)

 

 

Stephen Foreman | Lead Economist

Stephen is a Lead Economist on the Industry team. Stephen is responsible for monitoring and forecasting the global motor vehicle and aerospace sectors, as well as contributing to and communicating Oxford Economics’ global industry view, and managing a number of consultancy projects for manufacturing organisations.

Stephen joined Oxford Economics from the UK civil service, where he worked for 5 years on a range of macroeconomic, fiscal, tax and welfare policy issues across HM Treasury, the Office for Budget Responsibility and the Department for Work and Pensions. Most recently he worked directly for the Treasury’s Chief Economic Adviser and Head of the Government Economic Service, running the private office in the role of Private Secretary. Stephen holds an MSc in Economics from Birkbeck College, University of London (distinction) and a BA in Economics and Politics from the University of Exeter (first class).

Copy of Headshot - circle (12)

 

 

Johnathan Stewart | Senior Economist

Jonathan Stewart is a Senior Economist at Oxford Economics and works as a member of the Cities and Regions Forecasting team.

Jonathan is an Economist at Oxford Economics working within the Cities & Regions Forecasting team, specialising in sub-national economic forecasting and analysis. Jonathan plays a key role in Oxford Economics’ UK regional and local authority forecast services and also contributes to the bi-annual UK Regional Economic Outlook report. As well as baseline forecasting Jonathan works on a wide range of consultancy projects for public and private bodies and has significant experience in producing detailed bespoke scenario models. In recent years Jonathan has played a lead role in developing bespoke scenario models for several areas across the UK.

Jonathan is also responsible for the quarterly production of city and regional level forecasting across a number of Latin American countries including Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Puerto Rico and Venezuela.

Back to Events

Related Services

Inflation and growth, best enemies?

Event

Inflation and growth, best enemies?

The Ukrainian conflict and the Chinese lockdowns have propped up inflationary pressures, which are clearly here to stay. But until when? Will the boost given by the (temporary) end of Covid be enough to support global growth while monetary policies tighten and confidence plummets?

Find Out More
Inflation et croissance, meilleurs ennemis ?

Event

Inflation et croissance, meilleurs ennemis ?

Tirée par le conflit Ukrainien et le confinement Chinois, la vague inflationniste est partie pour durer. Mais jusqu’à quand? L’impulsion donnée par la fin (temporaire) du Covid sera-t-elle suffisante pour soutenir la croissance, en France et dans le monde, alors que les politiques monétaires se resserrent et la confiance chute ?

Find Out More