South East Asia: Growth is gearing up but not yet at full steam

Tighter mobility restrictions around the turn of the year will weigh on growth in Q1 for most SEA economies while inflation is also trending higher. We expect the region’s recovery to gather pace in Q2, led by strong exports and electronics demand amid a global rebound. But a return to pre-pandemic levels remains some time off for some and the recovery will continue to depend on a country’s health success and policy support. New outbreaks and a slower vaccination progress remain key risks to the outlook.

This webinar was originally broadcast at:

  • APAC – Tuesday 27th April | 11:00 SGT
  • EMEA – Wednesday 28th April | 13:00 BST
  • AMERICAS – Wednesday 28th April | 14:00 EDT

Sian Fenner

Lead Asia Economist

Sian Fenner

Lead Asia Economist

Sian Fenner | Lead Asia Economist

Sian Fenner is a Lead Asia Economist at Oxford Economics and is involved in the forecast and presentation of the Asian macroeconomic views with a lead role in our coverage of Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Japan. Sian re-joined Oxford Economics in 2013 and has over 15 years’ experience as a macroeconomic forecaster in the public and private sector primarily focused on the Asia-Pacific region. Prior to joining Oxford Economics Sian worked for Lloyds Bank as the lead emerging market economist responsible for forecasting the economic outlook, fx and monetary policy.

 

Sung Eun Jung

Economist 

Sung Eun Jung

Economist 

Sung Eun Jung | Economist 

Sung Eun Jung is an Economist at Oxford Economics and is focused on the Asia-Pacific region with a lead role in the coverage of Indonesia and Singapore. She manages regular forecast updates, writes quantitative analyses and conducts media interviews on key macroeconomic topics. Prior to joining Oxford Economics in 2019, she worked at the International Monetary Fund as a research officer, working on various research projects covering G20 economies and key Asian countries such as China and Australia.

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