Investment strategy: The case for non-US assets

The roll-out of Covid-19 vaccines and the recent Democrat victories in Georgia have helped drive a further rotation into non-US assets. We examine the factors that could help turn this recent reversal into a multi-year story.

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Gaurav Saroliya | Director of Global Macro Strategy

Gaurav Saroliya is Director of Global Macro Strategy. He is responsible for our overall asset price views and for developing and delivering our investment strategy product offering. His focus is on providing thematic-research based actionable investment advice for investment managers. But his analytics are relevant for corporate Treasurers too insofar as they generate actionable dynamic hedging advice for cash-flow exposures.

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Daniel Grosvenor | Director of Equity Strategy

Daniel joined Oxford Economics in June 2019. He is an equity strategist, responsible for developing our equity views across countries, sectors and investment styles. Daniel joined Oxford Economics from HSBC, where he spent a decade working within their global equity strategy team, in both London and Hong Kong, and was most recently the lead of their European strategy product. Daniel has a Bsc in Economics from the University of Bath.

 

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