Climate Change: Why knowing your supply chain is important

Topic: COVID-19 has demonstrated the fragility of supply chains. Globalisation has seen supply chains become longer and longer, and reach the furthest corners of the world economy. Knowing where your supply chain goes is of increasing importance to not only help guard against risk, but also for companies to see the composition of their environmental footprint, and potentially take actions to change it.

Pete Collings

Director of Economic & Sustainable Impact Consulting

Pete Collings

Director of Economic & Sustainable Impact Consulting

Pete Collings | Director of Economic & Sustainable Impact Consulting

Pete Collings leads Oxford Economics’ Economic Impact Consulting teams in Europe and the Middle East. During his time at Oxford Economics, Pete has managed and conducted a number of large consulting projects including a major global economic impact study of Etihad Airways, a project assessing the contribution Rolls-Royce makes to both the UK and the global economy, Oxford Economics’ impact work for Abu Dhabi Ports Company, several pieces assessing the economic impact of nuclear power in the UK, a number of studies exploring Gatwick Airport’s economic contribution and research assessing Boeing’s employment impact on the EU.

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