Cities globally in 2021: are they recovering as well as expected? What next?

How well are cities recovering in 2021 compared with expectations? How does performance vary and why? Are there any signs of profound structural change as a result of the Covid pandemic, and what are some of the risks and opportunities? We will be addressing those questions and other topics during the webinar.

We will be repeating the same webinar to cater for the difference in time zones between EMEA, the Americas and APAC:

  • EMEA – Wednesday 23rd June | 10:00 BST
  • Americas – Wednesday 23rd June| 16:00 EDT
  • APAC – Thursday 24th June | 10:00 HKT

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Anthony Light | Director of City Services

Anthony is Director of City Services at Oxford Economics. He specialises in sub-national economic forecasting and analysis and is responsible for overseeing our suite of global city forecasting services and city consultancy projects. Anthony has worked extensively with a broad range of clients across both the public and private sectors, especially the real estate industry.

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Richard Holt | Head of Global Cities Research

Richard is Head of Global Cities Research, with responsibility for developing Oxford Economics’ in-depth knowledge of city and regional economies, globally. Richard contributes to both our regular city forecast services and to our consultancy offer, leading major assignments for private and public sector clients. Richard has worked as an economist in London, Birmingham and New York, for the Confederation of British Industry, in the City of London for Scrimgeour Kemp-Gee, for Experian and for Capital Economics. 

 

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