Research Briefing | May 20, 2021

MENA | Coronavirus tracker for the GCC – May update

Coronavirus tracker for the GCC – May update

Over the past week, there has been a series of announcements about plans in the GCC to ease lockdown and travel restrictions. These include Dubai allowing brunches and live music and reducing social distancing to 2 metres while increasing capacity in restaurants and hotels, and Kuwait allowing indoor dining and ending quarantine for vaccinated travellers. Travels restrictions are also being eased elsewhere as Saudi Arabia re-opened to international flights and Abu Dhabi announced plans to end quarantine restrictions on 1 July.

What you will learn:

  • The UAE is also moving forward with implementing the significant set of reforms announced over the past year. From 1 June, the UAE will allow 100% foreign ownership of onshore entities.
  • The new rules will strengthen investor confidence in the UAE and should simplify investment decisions and management of local assets, which will help the UAE benefit from the expected upswing in the global economy.
  • This MENA Weekly updates the Coronavirus tracker for the GCC, which draws on non traditional data sources such as Google location data and STR hotel occupancy data, and high-frequency data such as PMIs, commodity prices and financial market numbers.
Back to Resource Hub

Related Services

Post

Why an ageing population doesn’t mean soaring inflation

What’s the future for inflation? Joachim Nagel, the new president of Germany's central bank, believes the rapidly ageing global population will play a key role – ramping up pressure on prices in the medium term. While we agree slowing labour supply will stifle output growth, in his recent discussion Nagel failed to fully consider the demand side of the argument.

Find Out More

Post

Surging global food prices could drive eurozone core inflation higher

Along with energy prices, global food prices have emerged as a key driver of the eurozone's current inflationary surge. Like other advanced economies, eurozone countries tend to be less exposed to global food price fluctuations. But if persistent and combined with strong demand, high food prices could result in a higher pass-through to core inflation.

Find Out More