Webinar

The transformation of Japan from a goods to capital exporter

In the past decade, Japan has transformed itself from a goods to capital exporter, which has significant implications for its external balance, corporate profits, and FX markets. While the demographic outlook suggests that Japan will continue to accumulate foreign assets in the coming decades, there are challenges ahead to further improve the rate of return on investments. Navigating the evolution of the rivalry between the US and China and the impact of climate change will present key challenges to maintaining profitable FDI in Asia.

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Shigeto Nagai

Head of Japan Economics

Shigeto Nagai

Head of Japan Economics

Shigeto Nagai | Head of Japan Economics

 

Shigeto joined Oxford from the Bank of Japan, where he was previously Director-General of the BoJ’s International Department, contributing to the BoJ’s official views on the global economy at its Monetary Policy Meetings, as well as leading the BoJ’s liaison with other institutions across the world, including the governments and central banks of key economies and international financial institutions. Shigeto’s career at the BoJ included senior positions as General Manager for Europe, Associate Director-General in the Monetary Affairs Department, and Director and Head of Global Research. In addition to his expertise in global research, he also has extensive experience in foreign reserve management and central bank cooperation in Asia. He was seconded to the IMF in Washington DC from 1993 to 1996 as a member of the Fund’s economics staff. Shigeto holds an MA in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in the United States and a BA in Economics from the University of Tokyo.

 

 

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