Global Cities: The urban economic landscape in 2040

The population living in the world’s 900 major cities has risen by more than 600 million over the last 20 years and we project a similar increase by 2040. But future growth trends vary significantly across the world, which will cause a further shift in the economic power of cities by 2040. In this webinar, we will present which cities are leading the race to join today’s urban superpowers at the top of the rankings, as well as other highlights from our annual Global Cities release based on new research into harmonised city definitions.

Please note that we will be holding one webinar each for APAC, EMEA and Americas friendly time zones:

  • APAC – Tuesday 30th November | 10:00 HKT
  • EMEA – Tuesday 30th November | 10:00 GMT
  • Americas – Tuesday 30th November | 16:00 EST

Mark Britton

Associate Director, International Cities and Regions Forecasting

Mark Britton

Associate Director, International Cities and Regions Forecasting

Mark Britton | Associate Director, International Cities and Regions Forecasting

Mark  specialises in sub-national economic forecasting and analysis and contributes to our suite of global city forecasting services. Mark has extensive experience in regional forecasting, model building and economic analysis for a broad range of clients across both the public and private sectors, especially the real estate industry.

George Bowen

Economist

George Bowen

Economist

George Bowen | Economist

George first joined Oxford Economics in July 2016 as part of his industrial training scheme. He worked within the Cities and Regions team for 12 months, focussing on international cities research, European regional forecasts and geographical research. Following the industrial placement, George returned to Surrey University, where he completed his studies and received a first-class degree in BSc Economics. 

 

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