Research Briefing | Nov 4, 2021

Global | Carbon prices are too low, but how high should they be?

Ipad Frame - Global-Carbon-prices-are-too-low-but-how-high-should-they-be

Carbon pricing – either through a tax or an emissions trading scheme – will play an integral role in efforts to reduce carbon emissions. By capturing the cost of greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon price incentivises consumers to move to low-carbon products and firms to innovate away from them.

What you will learn:

  • One fundamental problem is that the economic impact of a carbon price rests on the rate of the shift to low-carbon technologies.
  • This isn’t a number readily at hand to economists, nor is it typically ground out by large, multi-sectoral models that explicitly allow for substitution between sectors or goods.
  • The alternative is to equate the carbon price to the social cost of carbon – the damage caused by GHG emissions.
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