Research Briefing | Nov 13, 2021

[Video] Can the recovery survive without policy?

Andrew Goodwin speaking about 'Can the recovery survive without policy?'

On Wednesday 3rd November, Oxford Economics hosted its quarterly UK & Global Outlook Conference. This invite-only event for our key clients and prospects is always a thoroughly enjoyable opportunity to catch up with familiar faces and new ones, but this event was a particularly special one for us, since we were also celebrating Oxford Economics’ 40th Anniversary!

To celebrate this milestone, we are offering our blog & social media followers the exclusive opportunity to watch all 3 sessions from the conference. To watch the second session ‘Can the recovery survive without policy?’ by Andrew Goodwin, complete the form today. Subscribe to the blog to be notified when we release session 3 ‘The economic transformation to meet net zero’ or check out session 1 Inflationary and volatile: The new reality?.

Can the recovery survive without policy? by Andrew Goodwin

  • The combination of very stimulative policy settings and reopening after lockdown has resulted in a strong recovery.
  • But the easy gains are now behind us and policy support is being withdrawn.
  • Will this mean the recovery grinds to a halt in 2022? What will be the new engines of UK growth?
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