Events and Webinars

We run a worldwide programme of insightful conferences, roundtables, webinars and podcasts presented by our economic experts.

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Webinar
Global Climate Service: An Equitable Path for Sustainable Development

with Beatrice Tanjangco and Manuela Kiehl | Online | January 19, 2024

Climate-related disasters continue to break records and disproportionately impact developing economies. At COP 28 in November, the issue of how we fund the climate transition was pushed to 2024. In light of this, Oxford Economics’ Global Climate Service updates its bespoke Sustainable Development scenario, in which advanced economies take a lead in climate mitigation and allow developing economies more time to wind down their emissions. They also provide cross-country funding transfers because developing economies don’t have the necessary spending power to invest in green infrastructure and technologies. This pathway provides developing economies with the leeway to pursue their climate agenda without compromising growth or the global transition. In this webinar, we will review what happened in COP28 and the economic implications of a Sustainable Development scenario relative to other climate pathways such as Net Zero.

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Webinar
How to manage sustainability risks over time

with Jake Kuyer and Carina Manitius | Online | November 2, 2023

Economic forecasting and scenario analysis across countries and sectors are critical to developing a future proof strategy for your business. Drawing on our team of 350+ full-time economists we can project how a company’s economic profile, including value chains, might change over time, assessing the exposure to risk, such as physical & transitional risks associated with climate change, and stress test macroeconomic & socio-political events. In this webinar we will demonstrate how Oxford Economics uses economics and our suite of global, transparent models to help companies manage their direct and indirect impact and dependence on each element of sustainability not just for today, but by taking a forward looking view, to address the challenges of an uncertain future.

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Webinar
Ripe for a correction

with Daniel Grosvenor and Javier Corominas | Online | September 12, 2023

In our first webinar after the summer recess, our Director of Global Macro Strategy Javier Corominas and Director of Equity Strategy Daniel Grosvenor outline why they think the recent equity market correction will continue and why it is now time to add duration to portfolios. The latest update of our Cross Asset framework indicators supports defensive allocations. Investor sentiment has become overly optimistic and risk assets look vulnerable to tighter financial conditions and a deteriorating global credit impulse which we think will contribute to a sustained period of weak global economic growth. We think DM bonds are increasingly attractive in this environment following the recent rise in long-end yields.

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Webinar
Climate change: The big hairy audacious problem… with the big hairy questions

with Felicity Hannon, Jake Kuyer, Bethan Jewsbury, Richard Holt and Adrian Cooper | Online | October 26, 2022

Climate change is here. And (almost) everyone accepts that urgent and transformational action is necessary by policymakers and organisations to understand and mitigate its impact. But it’s a larger, broader and more complex challenge than any other we’ve faced in modern times, and many organisations are struggling to decide where to start, let alone what to do. There are definitely more questions than answers. We have brought together experts from across Oxford Economics to discuss some of the questions they have been asked recently.

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Webinar
Global Climate Service: Pathways to a fair transition

with Felicity Hannon, David Winter and Beatrice Tanjangco | Online | October 18, 2022

Climate-related disasters continue to break records and disproportionately impact developing economies. Looking ahead to COP 27 in November, the issues of justice and fairness in the climate transition will be key discussion points. In light of this, Oxford Economics’ Global Climate Service explores a new scenario, Sustainable Development, in which advanced economies and large emitters (e.g., China) take the lead in climate mitigation. The remaining countries wind down their emissions more gradually, while still benefiting from technological spill overs that ensure widespread improvements in energy access, mix, and electrification. These pathways provide developing economies with the leeway to pursue their development agenda without compromising growth or the global transition.

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Webinar
Understanding climate change from a global to local perspective

with Alex Mackle, Barbara Byrne Denham and Ben Wright | Online | January 28, 2022

Join us as we bring together important perspectives and analysis on climate change for US policy-makers and business decision-makers. Lead Economist Alex Mackle will explain our recent research on modelling the economic impact of climate change, climate change scenarios, and our new Global Climate Service. Senior Economist Barbara Denham will discuss the potential impact on population growth and demographics for US states and metros. Ben Wright, Senior Research Manager for Thought Leadership, will share key findings and best practices from our most recent studies with SAP, the Consumer Technology Association, and EY on how companies should re-think their approach to climate change and make their operations more sustainable.

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Webinar
Investment and innovation opportunities from a net zero energy transition

with Felicity Hannon | Online | January 18, 2022

Achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050 will require a radical transformation of the whole economy. But it also creates a unique opportunity to boost private investment and innovation. In this webinar Felicity will present Oxford Economics' new Net Zero Transformation scenario which explores some of the potential upside risks from the transition to net zero emissions by 2050. We assume that prevailing market inefficiencies are eliminated, and private investors grow confident that they can generate profits on green investment. This demand stimulus boosts long run productivity through improved resource allocation, reduced environmental damages and greater innovation.

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