The new post-covid long-term looks much like the old one

Topic: How has the coronavirus pandemic affected the long-term outlook for world growth? We outline how we have become more optimistic about the extent of the long-term damage the pandemic will cause to world GDP over the last year – but also how we still see the rate of world growth in the long-term being modest. Key structural headwinds to growth that we identified before the pandemic remain in place, and we identify new downside risks created by the pandemic.

We will be repeating the same webinar to cater for the difference in time zones between APAC, EMEA and the Americas:

  • APAC – Tuesday 19th October | 10:00 HKT
  • EMEA – Tuesday 19th October | 10:00 BST
  • Americas – Tuesday 19th October | 16:00 EDT

Adam Slater

Lead Economist 

Adam Slater

Lead Economist 

Adam Slater | Lead Economist 

Adam Slater is a lead economist at Oxford Economics, responsible for contributing to and helping to communicate Oxford Economics’ global macroeconomic view, including writing for and helping edit regular publications. He has a particular interest in developments in financial markets, and a specific forecast interest in the Japanese economy. He is also involved in Oxford Economics’ work on a variety of consultancy projects.

Back to Events

Related Services

air travel

Event

Economic woes and travel flows – tourism outlook

Travel recovery has accelerated throughout 2022, with strong rebounds evident in a wide range of destinations during the northern hemisphere summer months, as travellers have begun to return to more typical activities. However, complete recovery to pre-pandemic levels is not guaranteed. In this session we will explore the impacts of the slower economic activity and rising costs on travel demand and present our latest global outlook.

Find Out More

Event

Is sterling in the midst of a sell-off or a full-blown crisis?

Policy announcements are coming thick and fast in the UK at the moment and have been greeted with the most significant sell-off in UK assets in decades. Is this a case of markets overreacting or have the UK public finances been put on an unsustainable footing? Will the Bank of England react to the fall in sterling or are markets setting themselves up to be disappointed? We will set out our views on all these topics and set out the conditions under which we think this volatility will subside.

Find Out More