The new post-covid long-term looks much like the old one

Topic: How has the coronavirus pandemic affected the long-term outlook for world growth? We outline how we have become more optimistic about the extent of the long-term damage the pandemic will cause to world GDP over the last year – but also how we still see the rate of world growth in the long-term being modest. Key structural headwinds to growth that we identified before the pandemic remain in place, and we identify new downside risks created by the pandemic.

We will be repeating the same webinar to cater for the difference in time zones between APAC, EMEA and the Americas:

  • APAC – Tuesday 19th October | 10:00 HKT
  • EMEA – Tuesday 19th October | 10:00 BST
  • Americas – Tuesday 19th October | 16:00 EDT

Adam Slater

Lead Economist 

Adam Slater

Lead Economist 

Adam Slater | Lead Economist 

Adam Slater is a lead economist at Oxford Economics, responsible for contributing to and helping to communicate Oxford Economics’ global macroeconomic view, including writing for and helping edit regular publications. He has a particular interest in developments in financial markets, and a specific forecast interest in the Japanese economy. He is also involved in Oxford Economics’ work on a variety of consultancy projects.

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