The future of interest rates and inflation in the eurozone

We look beyond the pandemic to discuss where eurozone inflation and interest rates are heading over the next decades. The bloc’s real neutral interest rate has been on a consistent downward trend since 1980 and our analysis shows that it will remain negative for our entire forecast to 2050. This goes hand-in-hand with a weakness of eurozone aggregate demand which will depress inflation. We quantify and explain how nine secular forces are behind this, both historically and in our forecast.

We will be repeating the same webinar to cater for the difference in time zones between APAC, EMEA and the Americas:

  • APAC – Wednesday 1st December | 10:00 HKT
  • EMEA – Wednesday 1st December | 10:00 GMT
  • Americas – Wednesday 1st December | 16:00 EST

Daniel Harenberg

Lead Economist

Daniel Harenberg

Lead Economist

Daniel Harenberg | Lead Economist

Daniel is a Lead Economist working in Oxford Economics’ Global Team. Based in our Frankfurt office, he works on long-term, structural economic questions and provides coverage for the Netherlands. Prior to joining Oxford Economics, Daniel spent five years as a post-doctoral research fellow at the Center for Economic Research of ETH Zurich in Switzerland and at the Research Center SAFE of Goethe University in Frankfurt, where he used computationally intensive DSGE models to study investment, capital markets, and model uncertainty

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