Mid-year update on Canada’s economic outlook: Primed for super-charged growth in H2 and through 2022

Topic: Canada is on the verge of a growth spurt as widespread vaccinations permit a full reopening of the economy, pent up demand is released, consumers begin spending their excess savings, and fiscal and monetary stimulus continue in Canada and abroad. All provinces will fully recover by the end of this year, with Western provinces and metros expected to outperform the East after the disruption from the pandemic is overcome. Still, our new North American cities and regions scenario service suggests some downside risks will persist.

Please note that we will be holding one webinar each for Americas, EMEA and APAC friendly timezones:

  • Americas – Wednesday 18th August | 11:00 EDT
  • EMEA – Wednesday 18th August | 10:00 BST
  • APAC – Wednesday 18th August | 10:00 HKT

Tony Stillo Bio

Tony Stillo |Director of Canada Economics

Tony Stillo is the Director of Canada Economics at Oxford Economics, based out of the Toronto office. He is responsible for producing the macroeconomic forecast for Canada using Oxford Economics’ Global Economic Model, reporting on key data releases and producing/presenting research on key issues affecting the Canadian economy. Tony also helps support the work of other areas at Oxford Economics where there’s a Canadian angle.

Michael Davenport Bio

Michael Davenport |Associate Economist

Michael is an Associate Economist on the US Macro team with a particular focus on the Canadian Economy. He primarily supports the Director of Canada Economics in producing macroeconomic research and forecasts, monitoring Canada and the provinces, and liaising with clients and the media. Michael first joined Oxford Economics as an Economic Research Analyst Intern in the Toronto office before being promoted to Associate Economist in August 2019.

 

Back to Events

Related Services

Event

Inflation to fall further as ‘wartime characteristics’ fade

We show how the outburst of inflation in 2021-2023 can be traced in large part to ‘wartime’-style fiscal and monetary policies and pandemic-related distortions to labour and product markets. We also outline how these sources of inflationary pressure are now receding, which points to inflation rates in the G7 continuing to fall to 2% or lower this year and next.

Find Out More

Event

How the forecast may change after election day

During the next presidential term, the economy will receive a net boost from federal policymaking, and inflation will come in stronger, leading to a more cautious easing cycle by the Federal Reserve. This is the takeaway no matter the president and the political balance of power in Congress. In this webinar we will to take stock of the economy's performance across our six scenarios – two each for Trump, divided government, and the two most recent simulations for Biden.

Find Out More