Key trends for global industry in 2022

Topic: The early phase of the post-pandemic industrial expansion was exceptionally strong, but momentum waned in the second half of this year as component and raw materials shortages stymied production and raised costs. Rising backlogs and still-firm demand augur an acceleration in activity even as the broader sources of economic growth shift toward services – but supply chain constraints will linger well into next year, backloading the industrial growth profile.

Jeremy Leonard

Director of Global Industry Services

Jeremy Leonard

Director of Global Industry Services

Jeremy Leonard |Director of Global Industry Services

Jeremy Leonard is responsible for overseeing the work of the industry forecasting team and managing the operation and output of Oxford Economics’ 74-country, 100-sector Global Industry Model as well as related consultancy work. Jeremy’s knowledge and past experience span a broad range, including competitiveness and offshoring/reshoring, commodity price modelling, and applied economic research on sectors ranging from biotech to heavy manufacturing to telecoms.

Charlie Muir

Assistant Economist

Charlie Muir

Assistant Economist

Charlie Muir | Assistant Economist

Charlie first joined Oxford Economics in 2019 during a placement year that formed part of his undergraduate degree. He worked for the Data team for over a year, supporting the Industry team with all data requirements and forecasting numerous manufacturing subsectors. He then returned to the University of Bath, where he continued his studies and achieved a first-class degree in Economics. Charlie re-joined Oxford Economics in July 2021 and is now responsible for forecasting the Food, beverages & other consumer goods sector, carrying out bespoke forecasting and data development.

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