Key Themes for Cities in 2022

Topic: How different will 2022 be for the world’s major cities, compared with 2021? Will it be a continuation of partial and often erratic recovery, or will there be more of a take-off? Will working from home fade away, and will tourists be back in force? Might macroeconomic worries, plus adaption to climate change, cloud the picture? And are the answers the same for all major cities, or will trajectories sharply diverge?

Richard Holt

Head of Global Cities Research

Richard Holt

Head of Global Cities Research

Richard Holt | Head of Global Cities Research

Richard is Head of Global Cities Research, with responsibility for developing Oxford Economics’ in-depth knowledge of city and regional economies, globally. Richard contributes to both our regular city forecast services and to our consultancy offer, leading major assignments for private and public sector clients. Richard has worked as an economist in London, Birmingham and New York, for the Confederation of British Industry, in the City of London for Scrimgeour Kemp-Gee, for Experian and for Capital Economics. 

Anthony Light

Director of Cities Services

Anthony Light

Director of Cities Services

Anthony Light | Director of Cities Services

Anthony specialises in sub-national economic forecasting and analysis and is responsible for overseeing our suite of global city forecasting services and city consultancy projects. Anthony has worked extensively with a broad range of clients across both the public and private sectors, especially the real estate industry. He has led a number of major consultancy projects, with recent examples including providing location advice to property companies wishing to invest in European markets, an assessment of the impact of the recession on major global cities, and numerous city benchmarking studies.

 

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