[Webinar] Foreign military involvement in Africa

The US has exited Afghanistan, but there is little sign of it quitting Africa, or ending its often military-led foreign policy on the continent. The same goes for France: even after a redeployment in the Sahel, its army will remain active against Islamist militancy there, in the Horn of Africa, and also in ‘new’ regions like the DRC and Mozambique. Russia is looking to expand its footprint on the continent and to challenge historical alliances based on colonial ties. We also consider the current and future roles of Turkey, China, and India, and look at some African countries that are using their militaries for power projection. This webinar looks at what role foreign militaries play in the continent and how this role could change going forward.

Louw Nel

Senior Political Analyst

Louw Nel

Senior Political Analyst

Louw Nel | Senior Political Analyst

Louw is a senior political analyst at NKC African Economics. He joined the company in 2020 after five years with South Africa’s official opposition party, serving as its operations director at Parliament. He is responsible for political coverage of South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Ethiopia, and six other African countries.

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