Construction inputs in short supply

Increasing demand and constrained supply of construction inputs has raised questions around industry capacity to deliver a strong pipeline of construction work. The slow untangling of Covid-19 restrictions and supply chain bottlenecks point to significant pressure on key inputs being sustained for some time. In this webinar we will discuss the risks and implications of these capacity constraints on our construction forecasts.

Talking points:

  • What is driving the increase in construction costs?
  • How long will industry be weighed down by capacity constraints?
  • What sectors will be most affected?
Nicholas Fearnley

Principal Economist

Nicholas Fearnley

Principal Economist

Nicholas Fearnley | Principal Economist

Nicholas Fearnley is a Principal Economist within BIS Oxford Economics, and is responsible the Engineering Construction in Australia service, which provides clients with forecasts and analysis of construction activity across eleven key sectors at the national and state level. Nicholas also project manages the Mining in Australia service, which analyses and forecasts commodity price movements, as well as mining exploration, investment, production, maintenance, and development costs.

Timothy Hibbert

Principal EconomistTimothy Hibbert is a Principal Economist in the Building and Construction forecasting unit of BIS Oxford Economics. Working over the full building spectrum, he oversees building forecast subscriptions including: Australia Building Forecast Service, Building Work Done and Regional Building. Timothy is also actively engaged in consultancy work across demand modelling, market sizing, benchmarking and policy analysis. 

Timothy Hibbert

Principal EconomistTimothy Hibbert is a Principal Economist in the Building and Construction forecasting unit of BIS Oxford Economics. Working over the full building spectrum, he oversees building forecast subscriptions including: Australia Building Forecast Service, Building Work Done and Regional Building. Timothy is also actively engaged in consultancy work across demand modelling, market sizing, benchmarking and policy analysis. 

Timothy Hibbert | Principal Economist

Timothy Hibbert is a Principal Economist in the Building and Construction forecasting unit of BIS Oxford Economics. Working over the full building spectrum, he oversees building forecast subscriptions including: Australia Building Forecast Service, Building Work Done and Regional Building. Timothy is also actively engaged in consultancy work across demand modelling, market sizing, benchmarking and policy analysis. 

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